Warning: Parameter 1 to wp_default_scripts() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/public/wp-includes/plugin.php on line 571

Category Archives: Four dimensions

Events, past and future.

Ideas for International Open Data Hackathon in Vancouver

This coming Saturday is International Open Data Hackathon day. In Vancouver, it’s happening at W2 Storyeum in Gastown (details via the ODHD wiki). There was a (very!) short session led by Aaron Gladders at BarCamp Vancouver on what we might focus our efforts on during the Open Data Hackathon, and we settled working on a […]

The vision of a technologist’s city: where people, spaces and information collide

“When,” asks Greg Lindsey in his Fast Company article, “did Silicon Valley become so obsessed with building cities?” His article describes the work of a company called Living PlanIT: Living PlanIT (pronounced “planet”) is the brainchild of Steve Lewis and Malcolm Hutchinson, a pair of IT veterans who met when Lewis was still a top […]

NetSquared Camp: Session on Non-Profits and Open Civic Data

I volunteered to lead a session on Non-Profits and Open Civic Data at yesterday’s NetSquaredCamp, and we talked and thought about how non-profits might make use of open data as part of their advocacy and convening conversations on what is important to us in improving our neighbourhoods and daily lives.

What to do with Professional Authority and Local Knowledge in Planning?

Many moments stand out in my memory of Vancouver TransitCamp, the unconference on public transit I helped convene back in 2007. One of those moments was when I got to talking to an acquaintance of mine who works as a planner. The precise trajectory of the conversation eludes me now, but I have a clear […]

The ‘Problem’ of Participation

Some gathering-of-thoughts for a paper that I am very excited to work on (and finish, because I’ve been excited to work on it for far, far too long!). In narrowing myself down from a paper topic, to a research question, to a problem, I find myself thinking about the “problem” of participation in planning. Like […]

Musings and reading on collaborative rationality in urban planning and civic projects

This is an extremely long post mashing together Beth Simone Noveck’s chapter on collaborative democracy with Judith Innes and David Booher’s recent book on collaborative rationality in planning called “Planning with Complexity,” mixed liberally with my own thoughts on community management in open source software. A lot of hand-waving, block quotes, and thinking out-loud.

Northern Voice 2010: From Tweets to Plans panel reflections

At this year’s Northern Voice, I was grateful to have been given the chance to moderate a panel, titled, “From Tweets to Plans: Online Conversations for Urban Planning.” I’d gotten the idea to do it from being invited to the SCARP Symposium by PlanningPool, where I found myself talking about blogging to urban planners, and […]

Municipal government correspondence on websites enables efficient sharing

Pete Quily directed me to a recent story in the Georgia Straight about West Vancouver’s opening up of Council Correspondence (this is their correspondence page for 2010) on their website. Charlie Smith, the author of the article, calls for all Metro Vancouver municipalities to follow suit, in making their interactions with everyone open and available. […]

Northern Voice 2010 — Location, mysteries, and making visible

…and 48 hours later, Northern Voice for 2010 is a wrap. Thanks to the hard work of all the organizers, who pulled off an incredible conference once again. This was my first year as a non-Moosecamp speaker. It was also the it was held not during reading week (owing to the Vancouver Olympics) and in […]

My Northern Voice 2010 Itinerary

Northern Voice is just about upon us! As usual, the schedule is absolutely packed with unbelievable sessions…too many to choose from, even! I’m also interested to see how the dynamic changes as a result of there being no MooseCamp day and the fact that the Atrium will be programmed with the Social Media Buffet. It’s […]